Leverette Family History Site

Our Family's Journey Through Time

Welcome

We are the Leverette's from Georgia, USA with our heritage deeply rooted in the southeastern part of the Country mainly southern Georgia and northern Florida. Or name Leverette had the terminal[e] added sometime during my father's generation. There is some controversy surrounding whether it was my father or one of his siblings who started adding the [e] during their school years, of course it depends on which family member you ask. Regardless, our entire family adopted the name change and we've been known as the Leverette's ever since except for my grandfather Henry Calvin Leverett who refused to except the name change.

Our name Leverett is a very old name dating from before 1066. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicles list an Earl of Leferyet in 1066 which has been translated as Leverett. The Domesdey Book list several Levretts and these would be the French spelling the name Leverett as they thought it should be spelled. In any event, from then until now, Leveretts have flourished though the name is only the 5260 on the list of the most popular names in the United States. From this name many derivatives have sprung, such as Laverett, Lawrett, Leverette, Levrett, Levverrett, Levierett, Liverett, Liverette, Louverett, and Loverett with the most common of these being Leverette, 12,000 plus on the list of the most popular names. Leveretts can be found all over the globe with the United States, England, Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, France and Germany having the most populations of the name. There have been mountains, glaciers, mosses, towns, roads, streets, subdivisions, physic’s formula and ships named for Leveretts, not to mention college buildings and churches. Here in Georgia there have been three towns, at least five roads/streets with the name of Leverett and I am sure there will be many more.

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The Bones of My Bones

main imageThe bones here are bones of my bone and flesh of my flesh. It goes to doing something about it. It goes to pride in what our ancestors were able to accomplish. How they contributed to what we are today. It goes to respecting their hardships and losses, their never giving in or giving up, their resoluteness to go on and build a life for their family. It goes to deep pride that the fathers fought and some died to make and keep us a nation. It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of who we are. So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before. "It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of who we are. So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before."by Della M. Cummings Wright; Rewritten by her granddaughter Dell Jo Ann McGinnis Johnson; Edited and Reworded by Tom Dunn, 1943.

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Our Families

Our Ancestors Were Adventurers
Leverette Family
Henry Calvin Leverett

Henry Calvin Leverett

Born in Terrell County, Georgia on 7 Mar 1888

Married Mary Malissa Autry in 1909

Autry Family
Mary Malissa Autry

Mary Malissa Autry

Born in Sumter County, Georgia on 28 Mar 1890

I've been told Malissa was a crack shot with a pistol.

Stephenson Family
Asa Jackson Stephenson

Asa Jackson Stephenson

Asa Jackson Stephenson was born in Grady County, Georgia in Jan 1889.

Asa Jackson Stephenson was a rural mail carrier.

McCranie Family
Rosa Virginia McCranie

Rosa Virginia McCranie

Born in Brooks County, Georgia in Apr 1890

Rosa Virginia McCranie married Asa Jackson Stephenson on 1 Jul 1909. Rosa and Asa had five children with only one to reach adulthood.



Robert Euston Leverettebottom image

Robert Euston Leverette was born 24 Nov 1912 to parents Henry Calvin Leverett and Mary Malissa Leverette.

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Our Favorite Genealogy Quotes

We Hope You Enjoy Them

Maisie Stephenson Leverettebottom image

Maisie Rosalind Stephenson was born on 18 Apr 1916 to parents Asa Jackson and Rosa Virginia Stephenson. She was the only child to reach adulthood out of five siblings.

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We strive to document all of our sources in this family tree. If you have something to add, please let us know.